Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Headquarters of leading pan-African rice research and development organization to return to Côte d’Ivoire


The Director General of Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice), Dr Harold Roy-Macauley, is leading a delegation to Côte d’Ivoire to announce the return of the AfricaRice headquarters from Cotonou, Benin, to Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, as directed by the Center’s Board of Trustees.

“We wish to officially inform Ivorian Government authorities and the population as a whole of the AfricaRice Board of Trustees’ decision on the imminent return of AfricaRice from its temporary to its permanent headquarters in Côte d’Ivoire,” said Dr Roy-Macauley. 

The Board decision is in line with Resolutions of the AfricaRice Council of Ministers, which is the highest oversight body of the Center. AfricaRice is an intergovernmental association of 25 African member countries. It is also one of the 15 international agricultural research Centers that are members of the CGIAR Consortium.

It was constituted as the West Africa Rice Development Association (WARDA) in the early 1970s by 11 West African countries. Recognizing the strategic importance of rice for Africa and the effective geographic expansion of the Center, its Council of Ministers decided in 2009 to change the Center’s name to “Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice)”.

Since 1987, the Center was operating from its headquarters in M’bé, near Bouaké, Côte d’Ivoire. In December 2004, because of the crisis in Côte d’Ivoire, the AfricaRice Board decided to relocate all headquarters staff, temporarily to Cotonou, Benin.

This decision to return to Côte d’Ivoire, therefore, marks a historic milestone for AfricaRice. It followed months of discussions with the Government of Côte d’Ivoire, close monitoring of the evolving security situation in the country, and an analysis of the financial and programmatic implications of the move.

The Government of Côte d’Ivoire generously offered AfricaRice a building in Abidjan to house the new headquarters in recognition of the pan-African status of the Center. The main research station will still be at M’bé. The government also provided financial support to defray part of the transfer costs.

The directive given by the Board was for the Director General and Management team to transfer the offices of the Director General, the Deputy Director General as well as the Central Directors (Research, Partnerships & Capacity Strengthening and Corporate Services) to the new headquarters building by September 2015.

A phased return of research activities from Cotonou to the Center’s 700-hectare research complex at M’bé, is envisaged based on sound strategic and an in-depth cost analysis of the rehabilitation and development of the M’bé research station, which will be approved by the Board during its September meeting in 2015.

The M’bé station, which has all the main rice-growing agro-ecologies, has until now been maintained by a small technical team under the supervision of a regional representative. For the past few years, activities carried out at the M’bé station has focused on the production of foundation seeds within the context of enhancing the access to quality rice seeds, following demands made by several AfricaRice member countries.

Potential Benefits

The return of the AfricaRice headquarters to Côte d’Ivoire not only signals the return to stability but also the economic emergence of the country. The presence of AfricaRice will contribute to job creation, especially amongst the youth, in the science domain.

The relative proximity of the country to  newly generated rice scientific knowledge, technologies, tools, methods, practices and policy options, as well as easy access to training opportunities for strengthening capacities of the different categories of actors involved in the rice value chain, offered by AfricaRice, will contribute to boosting the rice sector in the country in general.

“The government has pledged strong support to AfricaRice and this is of mutual interest as the country has set an ambitious target to achieve rice self-sufficiency and be a rice exporter by 2018,” stated AfricaRice Board member Dr Séraphin Kati-Coulibaly, Director General of Scientific Research and Technological Innovation, Ivorian Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research.

“We wish to convey our deep appreciation to the Ivorian government and people and confirm that we are equally committed to helping the country achieve its objective of rice self-sufficiency in 2018,” Dr Roy-Macauley stated.

In addition to meeting with Government authorities, the AfricaRice Director General and members of his delegation will also interact with research and development partners, including among others the following organizations:
 
·       National Office for the Development of Rice (ONDR)
·       National Agency for Support to Rural Development (ANADER)
·       National Agricultural Research Center (NARC)
·       Interprofessional Fund for Agricultural Research and Advice (FIRCA), executing agency of West Africa Agricultural Productivity Program (WAAPP-Côte d’Ivoire)
·       Directorate of scientific research and technological innovation of the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research,
·       University Felix Houphouet-Boigny,
·       Nangui Abrogoua University
·       Research Institute for Development (IRD)
·       Centre for International Cooperation in Agronomic Research for Development (CIRAD)
·       African Development Bank (AfDB)
·       World Bank
·       International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and
·       Organization of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
 
The delegation will also visit the AfricaRice research station in M’bé and meet with the local authorities and staff.

“Given that Côte d’Ivoire is fast becoming the powerhouse for rice production in the Mano River region in particular, AfricaRice is very happy at the prospects of returning home and playing a strategic role in contributing to delivering on the exciting rice development agenda, building on existing and new partnerships,” said Dr Roy-Macauley.

-----------
About AfricaRice
AfricaRice is one of the 15 international agricultural research Centers that are members of the CGIAR Consortium. It is also an intergovernmental association of African member countries.
The Center was created in 1971 by 11 African countries. Today its membership comprises 25 countries, covering West, Central, East and North African regions, namely Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Gabon, the Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo and Uganda.
AfricaRice staff are based in Cote d’Ivoire as well as in Benin, Liberia, Madagascar, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Tanzania. For more information visit: www.AfricaRice.org

Le siège de l’organisation panafricaine leader de la recherche et du développement rizicoles retourne en Côte d’Ivoire


Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, le 29 avril 2015 – Le Directeur général du Centre du riz pour l’Afrique (AfricaRice), Dr Harold Roy-Macauley, conduit une délégation en Côte d’Ivoire pour annoncer le retour du siège d’AfricaRice de Cotonou, Bénin, à Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, conformément aux directives du Conseil d’administration du Centre.

« Nous souhaitons informer officiellement les autorités du gouvernement ivoirien et la population dans son ensemble de la décision du Conseil d’administration d’AfricaRice en vue d’un retour imminent d’AfricaRice de son siège temporaire à son siège permanent en Côte d’Ivoire, » a déclaré Dr Roy-Macauley. 

La décision du Conseil d’administration est en conformité avec les Résolutions du Conseil des ministres d’AfricaRice, qui est l’organe suprême de gouvernance du Centre. AfricaRice est une association intergouvernementale de 25 pays membres africains. Il est aussi l’un des 15 Centres internationaux de recherche agricole qui sont membres du Consortium du CGIAR.

Il a été créé au début des années 1970 par 11 pays de l’Afrique de l’Ouest en tant qu’une Association pour le développement de la riziculture en Afrique de l’Ouest (ADRAO). Reconnaissant l’importance stratégique de la riziculture pour l’Afrique et l’expansion géographique effective du Centre, son Conseil des ministres a décidé en 2009 de changer le nom du Centre en « Centre du riz pour l’Afrique (AfricaRice) ».

Depuis 1987, le Centre fonctionnait à partir de son siège à M’bé, près de Bouaké, Côte d’Ivoire. En décembre 2004, en raison de la crise en Côte d’Ivoire, le Conseil d’administration d’AfricaRice avait décidé de relocaliser temporairement l’ensemble du personnel du siège à Cotonou au Bénin.

La présente décision relative au retour du siège marque donc un repère historique pour AfricaRice. Elle fait suite à des mois de discussions avec le gouvernement de Côte d’Ivoire, au  suivi étroit de l’évolution de la situation sécuritaire du pays et d’une analyse des implications du déménagement sur la situation financière et des programmes de recherche.

Le Gouvernement de Côte d’Ivoire a généreusement mis à la disposition d’AfricaRice un bâtiment à Abidjan pour abriter le nouveau siège en reconnaissance du statut panafricain du Centre. La principale station de recherche sera toujours à M’bé. Le gouvernement a amorcé le paiement au soutien financier pour couvrir une partie des coûts du transfert.

La directive du Conseil d’administration était pour le DG et l’équipe de direction de procéder au transfert des bureaux du Directeur général, du Directeur général adjoint et ceux des Directeurs centraux (Recherche, Partenariats & Renforcement des capacités et Services institutionnels) dans le nouveau bâtiment du siège d’ici septembre 2015.

Un retour séquencé des activités de recherche de Cotonou au complexe de recherche de 700 hectares à M’bé est envisagé sur la base d’une analyse stratégique solide et d’une analyse approfondie des coûts de la réhabilitation et de la mise en valeur de la station de recherche de M’bé. Ce retour sera approuvé par le Conseil d’administration lors de sa réunion de septembre 2015.

La station de M’bé, qui couvre toutes les principales écologies rizicoles, a été entretenue par une petite équipe technique sous la supervision du représentant régional. Pendant ces dernières années, la station a été utilisée pour la production des semences de base de riz dans le cadre de l'amélioration de l'accès à des semences de qualité, en réponse aux demandes de plusieurs pays membres d’AfricaRice.

Avantages potentiels

Le retour du siège AfricaRice en Côte d'Ivoire non seulement consacre le retour à la stabilité mais aussi l'émergence économique du pays. La présence d'AfricaRice contribuera à la création d'emplois, en particulier parmi les jeunes, dans le domaine de la science.

L’accès du pays aux nouvelles connaissances scientifiques, technologies, outils, méthodes, pratiques et options politiques rizicoles, ainsi que l'accès facile aux opportunités de formation pour le renforcement des capacités des différentes catégories d'acteurs dans la chaîne de valeur du riz, offert par AfricaRice, contribuera à redynamiser le secteur rizicole dans le pays.

« Le gouvernement a promis un soutien fort à AfricaRice. Il s’agit là d’un intérêt mutuel puisque le pays s’est fixé un objectif ambitieux d’atteindre l’autosuffisance en riz et d’être un exportateur de riz à l’horizon 2018, » a déclaré le membre du Conseil d’administration d’AfricaRice Prof Séraphin Kati-Coulibaly, Directeur Général de la Recherche Scientifique et de l’Innovation Technologique, ministère ivoirien de l’Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche Scientifique.

« Nous aimerions transmettre notre intime appréciation au gouvernement ivoirien et confirmer que nous sommes aussi engagés à l’accompagner dans l’atteinte de ses objectifs nationaux, » a déclaré Dr Roy-Macauley.

En plus des rencontres avec le gouvernement et les autorités locales à Abidjan, la délégation d’AfricaRice va interagir aussi avec les partenaires de la recherche et du développement, qui incluent, entre autres :

·       l’Office national pour le développement de la riziculture (ONDR),
·       l’Agence nationale d’appui au développement rural (ANADER),
·       le Centre national de recherche agronomique (CNRA),
·       le Fonds interprofessionnel pour la recherche et le conseil agricoles (FIRCA), agence d’exécution du Programme de productivité agricole en Afrique de l’Ouest (PPAAO-WAAPP Côte d’Ivoire),
·       la Direction de la recherche scientifique et de l’innovation technologique du ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur et de la Recherche scientifique,
·       l’Université Félix Houphouët-Boigny,
·       l’Université Nangui Abrogoua,
·       l’Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD),
·       le Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement (CIRAD),
·       la Banque africaine de développement (BAD),
·       la Banque mondiale,
·       le Fonds international de développement agricole (FIDA), et
·       l'Organisation des nations unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture (FAO)

La délégation visitera aussi la station de recherche d’AfricaRice à M’bé et rencontrera les autorités locales et le personnel.

«Étant donné que la Côte d'Ivoire est en passe de devenir une puissance  rizicole dans la région du fleuve Mano en particulier, AfricaRice se félicite des perspectives de retour à la maison et de jouer un rôle stratégique dans le programme captivant de développement de la riziculture, en s’appuyant sur les partenariats existants tout comme sur les nouveaux partenariats, » a dit Dr Roy-Macauley.


À propos d’AfricaRice

AfricaRice est l'un des 15 Centres internationaux de recherche agricoles membres du Consortium du CGIAR. C’est aussi une association de recherche intergouvernementale composée de pays membres africains.
Le Centre a été créé en 1971 par 11 Etats africains. A ce jour il compte 25 membres couvrant les régions d’Afrique de l’Ouest, du Centre, de l’Est et du Nord, notamment le Bénin, le Burkina Faso, le Cameroun, la République centrafricaine, le Tchad, la Côte d’Ivoire, la République démocratique du Congo, l’Égypte, le Gabon, la Gambie, le Ghana, la Guinée, la Guinée-Bissau, le Liberia, Madagascar, le Mali, la Mauritanie, le Niger, le Nigeria, la République du Congo, le Rwanda, le Sénégal, la Sierra Leone, le Togo et l’Ouganda.
Les agents sont affectés en Côte d'Ivoire, ainsi que dans les stations de recherche d'AfricaRice au Bénin, au Libéria, à Madagascar, au Nigeria, au Sénégal, en Sierra Leone et en Tanzanie.
Pour plus d’informations visiter : www.AfricaRice.org

Thursday, April 23, 2015

AfricaRice and CSIR-SARI launch a USAID-funded project to develop a sustainable rice seed system in Ghana

The Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice) and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research-Savannah Agricultural Research Institute (CSIR-SARI) jointly launched a 3-year project to stimulate the development of a sustainable rice seed system in the Northern and Upper East Regions of Ghana. The project, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) with a total of USD 1.4 million, was launched on 21 April 2015 at the CSIR-SARI Conference Hall in Nyankpala, Northern Region. USAID is simultaneously funding a similar project in five other countries in West Africa – Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal and Sierra Leone. Representatives of the partner organizations that attended the project launching discussed and confirmed the project’s objectives, deliverables and implementation plan.

Under this project, AfricaRice will provide Technical Assistance (TA) for (i) seed sector organization and planning to connect actors producing different categories of seed; (ii) capacity building in quality breeder seed production at CSIAR-SARI, private seed company support in close collaboration with other USAID partners (for foundation and certified seed) and farmer organizations (for quality declared seed); (iii) assessing and recommending optimal best-bet equipment for seed harvesting, processing and conditioning; and (iv) quality seed use promotion. The project also seeks to develop a sustainable rice seed system in the savannah ecological zone.

The project is being implemented by AfricaRice in collaboration with the CSIR-SARI, the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) and the Agricultural Technology Transfer (ATT) project funded by the USAID. Other ongoing Feed the Future (FTF) and USAID-funded activities for boosting the rice sector in Northern Ghana, in particular the Agricultural Development and Value Chain Enhancement (ADVANCE – Phase II), project will also participate. AfricaRice will work closely with the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA)’s Program for African Seed Systems (PASS) and the USAID West Africa Seed Project (WASP). The new Ghana FTF Policy Project is expected to play a vital role in establishing an enabling environment for the private sector to develop the rice seed sector.

The project comes at the right time as rice has become the second most important food crop after maize in Ghana. One of the key bottlenecks identified by the USAID mission and technical and financial partners involved in rice sector development in Ghana is lack of access to quality rice seed. Despite all the projects on the ground, the reality is that Ghana’s rice producers are unable to access quality rice seed. All categories of seed production are entirely dependent on ad-hoc project funding. There is no coherent seed planning and categories of seed are not linked. Seed inspection capacity is inadequate. As a result, quantities and quality of foundation and certified seed produced are very low compared to what would be required to boost Ghana’s rice production.

The main policy objective of the government of Ghana is to ensure that public services devoted to the production of the early classes of seed are optimized to form a strong foundation for the seed industry and to strongly support the private sector to take up responsibility for the production of the certified seed class, initially assisting them with the outputs from the public sector mandated agencies and cushioning them to progressively develop their own breeder and foundation seeds as soon as possible. This policy objective is to support the informal seed sector to integrate with the formal sector and systematically upgrade some of its practices with a view to portions of it eventually evolving into the formal seed sector and enhancing the growth of the formal sector.

Mr Boubakary Cisse, Coordinator of the project, made a presentation on the project’s objectives, outputs, activities and partners that will be involved in its implementation.

During a press interview, Dr Olupomi Ajayi, overall supervisor of the project in Ghana, Nigeria and Senegal, , said: “This project is unique because at the end of the project, we must leave behind a rice seed system that functions well and is sustainable and its impact should be felt by everyone involved in the seed system”. He then expressed gratitude to USAID for providing the financial support for the project, which would address the constraints and opportunities identified in the country’s national seed policy.

Mr Brian Conklin, Deputy Office Director/Agriculture Team Leader, Office of Economic Growth of USAID, Ghana called for effective collaboration with other rice sector projects, to ensure the transformation of the country’s rice industry. He said that USAID was already supporting other projects in the agriculture sector in the country and pledged his organization’s intention to continue with such interventions to make the rice industry attractive to improve the fortunes of farmers.

The Director of CSIR-SARI, Dr Stephen Nutsugah, commended the USAID for their support and urged farmers, agro-input dealers and other stakeholders to work together to ensure the successful implementation of the project. He said that the project would collaborate with other rice initiatives/programs to address the challenges facing the country’s rice industry.

The launching was followed on 22 April by the Rice Seed Stakeholders’ meeting which validated the workplan for the seed scaling project and assigned responsibilities for its implementation.

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Board approves return of AfricaRice headquarters to Côte d’Ivoire


The AfricaRice Board of Trustees has directed the new Director General Dr Harold Roy-Macauley and his Management team to initiate the first steps of a multi-phase return of its Headquarters to Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. September 2015 was set as the target date to have most Headquarters functions transferred to the new location.

The decision was taken at a Board meeting in Cotonou, Benin, 24-27 March 2015, and followed months of discussions with the Government of Côte d’Ivoire, close monitoring of the evolving security situation in the country and a medium-term analysis of the financial and programmatic implications of the move. A strategy to re-open major research operations at the Center’s 700 hectare research complex at M’bé, near Bouaké, was also agreed.

The Government of Côte d’Ivoire generously gave AfricaRice a building in Abidjan to house the new Headquarters and began providing financial support to defray part of the transfer costs. The Government and AfricaRice had earlier agreed on a revised host-country agreement that provides the Center with the necessary privileges and immunities to operate efficiently. 

Finally, the Board concluded that the security situation in Côte d’Ivoire had stabilized considerably and continues to improve, assuring a safe and secure reinstallation of AfricaRice staff and their families.“The government has pledged strong support to AfricaRice. This is of mutual interest as the country has set an ambitious target to achieve rice self-sufficiency and be a rice exporter by 2018,” stated AfricaRice Board member Dr Séraphin Kati-Coulibaly, Director General of Scientific Research and Technological Innovation, Ivorian Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research. 

Thanking Dr Kati-Coulibaly for bringing additional assurances from the government and also for his personal efforts to move forward the process, the Board Chair Dr Peter Matlon said, “We wish to convey our appreciation to the Ivorian government and confirm that we are equally committed to helping it achieve its national objectives.” 

Dr Matlon took the opportunity to also thank the Benin Government for its great support to the Center and assured that efforts will be made to minimize the social impacts of the move on the local staff in Benin, as stated in the Resolutions of the 29th AfricaRice Council of Ministers

In December 2004 because of the civil conflicts in Côte d’Ivoire, the AfricaRice Board had decided to relocate temporarily all headquarters staff to the regional station of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Cotonou, Benin. 

The important strategic decision to return the Center’s headquarters to Côte d’Ivoire made by the Board at its 37th meeting is in line with the Resolutions of the 28th and 29th Sessions of the AfricaRice Council of Ministers. The Council, which is the highest oversight body of AfricaRice, has reiterated since 2005 that Côte d’Ivoire remains the permanent headquarters of the Center.

As part of the first wave of the return plan, the offices of the Director General and the Deputy Director General as well as the Directorates of Partnerships & Capacity Strengthening and Administration & Finance will move by September 2015. The Board decided to hold its September 2015 meeting in Côte d’Ivoire.

“In our September 2015 meeting, we will decide on the timetable for the movement of research programs, based on a sound strategy and an in-depth cost analysis of the rehabilitation and development of the M’bé research station,” said Dr Matlon.

The M’bé station, which has all the main rice-growing environments, has been maintained by a small technical team under the supervision of a regional representative. For the past few years, the station has been used for the production of foundation rice seed in response to demands from several AfricaRice member countries.In addition to the important issue of the return of the headquarters, the Board examined matters relating to research activities, financial management, governance, business continuity and risk management. Recognizing the huge funding challenges facing the Center, the Board urged the Management to closely monitor its financial management. “Much greater emphasis needs to be given to resource mobilization and this is the only way that we can responsibly control risks.”

Appreciating the achievements made against the milestones set for the CGIAR Research Program on Rice, known as the Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP), Dr Matlon remarked, “We are impressed with the scope and quality of the work done.” The Board was also pleased with the results of the Center-commissioned external review of the ‘Sustainable Productivity Enhancement (SPE)’ program of AfricaRice.

A series of policies relating to ‘Occupational and Health Hazard, ’HIV/AIDS in the Workplace,’ and ‘Disability in the Workplace’ were approved. The Board appreciated the attention given by the Center to gender issues in the workplace and encouraged the Management to consider incorporating the youth dimension in the Center’s ‘Gender Equality’ policy.

The Board warmly welcomed three new Board members: Dr Sophie Thoyer from France, Dr Comlan Atsu Agbobli from Togo and Dr Séraphin Kati-Coulibaly from Côte d’Ivoire. It congratulated Dr Lala Razafinjara from Madagascar, who became the new Vice-Chair. 

It extended a special welcome to Dr Rita Sharma, Vice Chair of the Program Committee of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) Board, who participated in the 37th AfricaRice Board meeting as an observer as part of a new reciprocal arrangement between AfricaRice and IRRI Boards.

It bade a fond farewell to outgoing Board members Dr Henri Carsalade from France (former Chair of Audit Committee) and Mr Momodou Ceesay from the Gambia (former Vice-Chair). The outgoing interim Director General and former Board member and Chair of the Nomination Committee Dr Adama Traoré was also given a special farewell by the Board.
Related link RESOLUTIONS of the 29th Ordinary Session of Council of Ministers of AfricaRice, 10-11 December 2013, N’Djamena, Chad



Le Conseil d’administration approuve le retour du siège d’AfricaRice en Côte d’Ivoire

Le Conseil d’administration d’AfricaRice a ordonné au nouveau Directeur général Dr Harold Roy-Macauley et à son équipe de direction d’initier les premières étapes d’un retour en plusieurs vagues de son siège à Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. La date de septembre 2015 a été fixée comme date cible pour le transfert de la plupart des fonctions du siège dans le nouvel emplacement.

La décision a été prise lors d’une réunion du Conseil d’administration tenue du 24 au 27 mars 2015 à Cotonou, Bénin, suite à des mois de discussion avec le gouvernement de Côte d’Ivoire, un suivi étroit de la situation sécuritaire du pays et une analyse à moyen terme des implications financières et programmatiques du déménagement. Une stratégie visant à rouvrir les principales opérations de recherche dans les 700 hectares du complexe de recherche du Centre à M’bé, près de Bouaké, a été aussi convenue.

Le Gouvernement de Côte d’Ivoire a généreusement offert à AfricaRice un bâtiment à Abidjan pour abriter le nouveau siège et a commencé à fournir un soutien financier pour couvrir une partie des coûts du transfert. Le gouvernement et AfricaRice avaient convenu plus tôt d’un accord de siège révisé qui donne au Centre les privilèges et immunités nécessaires pour fonctionner efficacement. Le Conseil d’administration a finalement conclu que la situation sécuritaire en Côte d’Ivoire s’est stabilisée considérablement et continue de s’améliorer, ce qui garantit une réinstallation sûre et sécurisée du personnel d’AfricaRice et de leurs familles.

« Le gouvernement a promis un soutien fort à AfricaRice. Il s’agit là d’un intérêt mutuel puisque le pays s’est fixé un objectif ambitieux d’atteindre l’autosuffisance en riz et d’être un exportateur de riz à l’horizon 2018, » a déclaré le membre du Conseil d’administration d’AfricaRice Dr Séraphin Kati-Coulibaly, Directeur général de la Recherche scientifique et de l’Innovation technologique, ministère ivoirien de l’Enseignement supérieur et de la Recherche scientifique. 

Remerciant Dr Kati-Coulibaly d’avoir apporté des assurances supplémentaires de la part du gouvernement et aussi pour ses efforts personnels visant à faire avancer le processus, le président du Conseil d’administration Dr Peter Matlon a déclaré, « Nous aimerions transmettre notre appréciation au gouvernement ivoirien et confirmer que nous sommes aussi engagés à l’accompagner dans l’atteinte de ses objectifs nationaux. » 

Dr Matlon a saisi l’opportunité pour remercier aussi le gouvernement du Bénin pour son soutien fort au Centre et a assuré que des efforts seront faits en vue de minimiser les impacts sociaux du déménagement sur le personnel local au Bénin, conformément aux Résolutions du 29e Conseil des ministres d’AfricaRice. 

En décembre 2004, à cause des conflits civils en Côte d’Ivoire, le Conseil d’administration d’AfricaRice avait décidé de relocaliser tout le personnel du siège à la station régionale de l’Institut international d’agriculture tropicale (IITA), à Cotonou au Bénin. 

L’importante décision stratégique prise par le Conseil d’administration lors de sa 37e réunion de retourner le siège du Centre en Côte d’Ivoire est en conformité avec les Résolutions des 28e et 29e Sessions du Conseil des ministres d’AfricaRice. Le Conseil des ministres, qui est l’organe suprême de gouvernance d’AfricaRice, a réitéré depuis 2005 que la Côte d’Ivoire demeure le siège permanent du Centre.

Dans le cadre de la première vague du plan de retour, les bureaux du Directeur général et du Directeur général adjoint de même que les Directions du Partenariat & du renforcement des capacités et de l’Administration & des Finances vont déménager d’ici septembre 2015. Le Conseil d’administration a décidé d’organiser sa réunion de septembre 2015 en Côte d’Ivoire.

« Lors de notre réunion de septembre 2015, nous allons convenir du calendrier du déménagement des programmes de recherche, sur la base d’une stratégie solide et d’une analyse approfondie des coûts de la réhabilitation et de la mise en valeur de la station de recherche de M’bé, » a déclaré Dr Matlon.

La station de M’bé, qui dispose de toutes les écologies rizicoles, a été entretenue par une petite équipe technique sous la supervision d’un représentant régional. Au cours de ces dernières années, la station a été utilisée pour la production des semences de riz de base en réponse aux demandes venues de plusieurs pays membres d’AfricaRice.

En plus de l’importante question du retour du siège, le Conseil d’administration a examiné les questions relatives aux activités de recherche, à la gestion financière, à la gouvernance, à la continuité des activités et à la gestion du risque. Conscient des grands défis de financement auxquels le Centre se trouve confronté, le Conseil d’administration a exhorté le Management de suivre de près sa gestion financière. « Il nous faut mettre davantage l’accent sur la mobilisation des ressources, seul moyen pouvant nous permettre de maîtriser les risques de façon responsable.”

Appréciant les réalisations faites par rapport aux repères fixés pour le Programme de recherche du CGIAR sur le riz, connu sous le nom de Partenariat mondial de la science rizicole (GRiSP), Dr Matlon a déclaré, « Nous sommes impressionnés par l’étendue et la qualité du travail abattu. » Le Conseil d’administration a été aussi satisfait des résultats de la revue externe commandée par le Centre sur le programme ‘Amélioration de la productivité durable (SPE)’ d’AfricaRice.

Une série de politiques relatives au ‘Risque professionnel et sanitaire,’ ‘VIH/SIDA sur le lieu de travail,’ et ‘Handicap sur le lieu de travail’ ont été approuvées. Le Conseil d’administration a apprécié l’attention que le Centre a accordée aux questions de genre sur le lieu de travail et a encouragé le Management à examiner la possibilité d’incorporer la dimension jeunesse dans la politique du Centre sur ‘l’Egalité des genres’.

Le Conseil d’administration a souhaité la bienvenue à trois nouveaux membres du Conseil : Dr Sophie Thoyer de France, Dr Comlan Atsu Agbobli du Togo et Dr Séraphin Kati-Coulibaly de Côte d’Ivoire. Il a félicité Dr Lala Razafinjara de Madagascar, qui est devenu le nouveau Vice- président. 

Il a réservé un accueil spécial à Dr Rita Sharma, Vice-présidente du Comité des programmes du Conseil d’administration de l’Institut international de recherche sur le riz (IRRI), qui a participé à la 37e réunion du Conseil d’administration d’AfricaRice comme observatrice dans le cadre d’un nouvel accord bilatéral entre les Conseils d’administration d’AfricaRice et de l’IRRI.

Il a fait ses adieux aux membres sortants du Conseil d’administration Dr Henri Carsalade de France (ex-président du Comité d’audit) et M. Momodou Ceesay de Gambie (ex-Vice-président). Le Conseil d’administration a aussi fait un adieu spécial au Directeur général par intérim sortant et ancien membre du Conseil d’administration et président du Comité des nominations, Dr Adama Traoré.

Lien utile : RESOLUTIONS du 29ème Session Ordinaire du Conseil des Ministres d'AfricaRice, 10-11 décembre 2013, N’Djamena, Tchad

Saturday, April 18, 2015

AfricaRice Director General calls for integration of rice science in regional policy agenda

Impressed with the outputs of the AfricaRice Regional Station in Saint Louis, Senegal, in terms of high-yielding and stress-tolerant varieties,  improved agronomic packages, policy options and knowledge, AfricaRice Director General Dr Harold Roy-Macauley said, “The work that is being done at this Regional Station by a very dynamic team is focused and relevant. However, more efforts need to be made to integrate rice science in the regional policy agenda.”

Dr Roy-Macauley made these remarks to the staff during his first visit to the Saint Louis Regional Station. “This Station has made significant contributions to the rice sector development in the Sahel region and it is clear that the Sahel countries need you.”

After receiving a warm welcome from the scientists and support staff of the Regional Station, Dr Roy-Macauley visited the experimental fields and the laboratories for biotechnology, grain quality and soil science. The Acting Regional Station Head Dr Kabirou Ndiaye gave a brief overview of the Station’s activities which was complemented by presentations by scientists.

Dr Roy-Macauley took the opportunity to explain the principles and pillars of his vision in order to help AfricaRice grow into a big pan-African international Center of Excellence for research, development and capacity strengthening.

Cliquez ici pour écouter le discours du Dr Roy-Macauley / Clickhere to listen to Dr Roy-Macauley’s speech.  


Friday, April 10, 2015

STRASA-Africa project meet discusses progress in identifying stress-tolerant rice lines and seed road maps


Participants from the Stress Tolerant Rice for
Africa and South Asia (STRASA) meeting,
AfricaRice, Cotonou, Benin -- 13 February 2015
The Stress Tolerant Rice for Africa and South Asia (STRASA) phase III Africa annual meeting was held on the 13th of February 2015 in Cotonou, Benin. Forty six (46) participants from 19 countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gambia. Ghana, Japan, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda and USA) attended this meeting. Sixteen countries which are involved in the project were represented by their focal points.

Dr Gary Atlin, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Key personalities present at the meeting were Dr Gary Atlin of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Dr Marco Wopereis, Deputy Director General-Research and Development, AfricaRice; Dr Mathew Morell, Deputy Director General, IRRI; Dr Abdelbagi Ismail, Overall STRASA Coordinator, IRRI; Dr Baboucarr Manneh, STRAS-Africa Coordinator; and Dr Issoufou Kapran, Program Officer, Seed Production and Dissemination, AGRA. Representatives of several STRASA development partners such as CORAF/WECARD (West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development) and NAFASO (Private company in Burkina Faso) were also present.

The presentations and discussions focused on progress made by AfricaRice and IRRI-ESA project scientists and NARS partners in identifying and developing scalable products such as abiotic stress tolerant genes, breeding lines and varieties as well as dissemination strategies for the newly released stress tolerant varieties. In 2014, three drought tolerant lines were submitted for release in Mali (WAB 358-5-2-3-3-P, CNAX3031-78-2-1-1, WABC265) and 6 cold tolerant lines (Scrid 006-2-4-2-3, HR 17570-21-5-2-5-2-2-1-5, ARICA 9, WAS 62-B-B-14-1, PSBRC 96, WAS 203-B-B-1) were also submitted for release in Burundi and Mali. The need for greater integration of gender issues into the strategic results framework of the project was also emphasized at the meeting. Drafts Seed Road Maps developed by NARS partners for the newly released stress tolerant varieties were updated at the meeting. 

Dr Baboucarr Manneh highlights the achievements of the STRASA-Africa component.  Click here to listen to the podcast.